Youth calls for Voluteers

  • ydlc
  • 08th Nov, 2020

We are looking for 2 motivated volunteers for approved EVS project to work with young people in Ruse, Bulgaria through organizing free time activities, like workshops, sport events etc. and supporting and presenting the daily activities of the Municipal Youth Centre of Ruse. Some of the tasks of the volunteers will be: Information and promotion the youth activities for young people in the region. • Information and promotion the volunteering, EVS and Erasmus + Programm in schools, NGO and in front of the young people in Ruse and the region, organizing information meetings and events for promoting volunteering. • Language café – language exchange club with the local young people in the native language of the volunteers. • Participating in events and projects organizing by the Youth Centre • Supporting youth initiatives, festivals, cultural and sport events for the young people in Ruse. • Supporting Erasmus + Projects. • Volunteer have to develop his/her own project

We are looking for motivate, positive and open-minded volunteers, ready to learn and share new knowledge and skills. Will be nice for the projects if the volunteer have knowledge of office software programs, English, promoting and animation youth, new technologies, youth information and Youth European Programs. We would like the volunteer to develop his/her own project and organize workshops (crafts, desing, music, dance, sports, photo etc…)

The volunteers will share a rented flat in city of Ruse, the coordination organization will provide money for food. The travel costs will be reimburcement up to the band of the country.

- On-arrival training, organized by the hosting organization - On-arrival training, organized by the National Agency -Mid-term training, organized by the National Agency

YDLC To Mark Youth Day at KU EduHall

  • ydlc
  • 08th Nov, 2020

The Youth Development and Leadership for Change (YDLC) has made a plan to mark International Youth Day at KU Education Networkhall, an institution.

Youth For Change's mission is to enhance the well-being of children, individuals, families, and communities. To do this we have to acknowledge recent events and the many forms of individual, societal, and institutional racism that impact Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC). This is usually the place where it is proper to state that we will stand with integrity as an organization and stick to our values with a general statement. But, this time is different. We do need to stand by these values, but more importantly, we need to listen to what our staff, youth, families, and the communities we serve have to say. We must listen and challenge ourselves to move forward, to learn and grow, and to create a better tomorrow. What can we do to make a change, no matter how small? We must be humble, and make room to truly listen to each other, and those we serve. We must learn from each other. Together, we will move forward into a better tomorrow.

Youth For Change's culture includes a proactive process for continuous improvement. Here are some of the highlights from 2018 demonstrating the satisfaction, effectiveness, efficiency, and access to our services.

We also survey our clients and stakeholders every year and have included highlights from those surveys as well. Youth For Change uses the information gathered to assist us in continually improving our performance and providing excellent service to the children, individuals, families, and communities we serve.

Youth are more prone to Mental Illness

  • ydlc
  • 24th Sep, 2020

Mental Health is an integral part of health. There is no health without mental health. Twenty percent of the World’s Youth experience a mental health condition.

Investing in young people for secured future

  • ydlc
  • 24th Sep, 2020

Last week, a remarkably diverse and dedicated group of young changemakers from around the world gathered for YDLC’s Our Future, Our Voices—a virtual summit by, for, and with young people. For five days, they led workshops and discussions, connected with peers, and engaged with other experts from across sectors and generations.

The issues tackled at the virtual summit reflect the collective concerns of young people globally and align thematically with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It would be impossible to summarize the countless insights that emerged during the summit week; however, below are five takeaways that resonated strongly with participants.

  1. We can end violence in a generation. In a session titled How We Can End Violence in a Generation, Frank Fredericks—founder of World Faith—explored the causes of, and solutions to, communal violence. Violence is often regarded as an unsolvable problem—in fact, when people were asked which of the SDGs seemed least attainable, Goal 16 (Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions) topped the list. According to Fredericks, though, ending violence is possible. “There are three things that can help us take huge steps forward,” he explained. “For one, we need funders willing to fund innovative ideas that are statistically likely to fail, but which if successful will have a magnifying effect in the field.” Additionally, he discussed the importance of a shared approach to accessing impact and the need for cross-collaboration between researchers, policy makers, and practitioners.
  2. We should prioritize inclusivity in tech development. During New Frontiers: Harnessing Technology for Impact and Inclusion, Tiffany Tong—co-founder of Aeloi Technologies—and Dale Chrystie—Block Chain Strategist for FedEx—discussed the ways technology can drive, or impede, inclusion. “We need to design proactively for inclusion,” Tong said, “not retroactively. I advocate for not only standards, but ethical standards” in the development of new technology. A big part of this, she noted, must involve listening to the needs and challenges of real users, many of whom come from vulnerable populations. For example, not everyone who owns a smart phone can consistently afford data, so new apps should include offline functionality. When we listen to end users and address their issues in the design of new technology, she explained, we can ensure that “inclusiveness is embedded in our technologies and in our systems.”
  3. We need to create spaces for young people to share ideas. Two of the youngest changemakers at the virtual summit—11-year-old Arushi Nath and 17-year-old Isha Patel—shared their perspectives during a session titled Generation Now: Young People Living Their Values to Save Our Planet. Patel, who founded the organization The Green Sleep Project to empower young people to tackle climate change, discussed the importance of engaging young people and providing a space for them to share their ideas. “It starts in school,” she explained. “Students often feel hesitant to take the first step to showcase their ideas, so if adults can create a better environment, a more open curriculum in terms of giving students the opportunity to suggest their own ideas and initiatives, this would be a great starting point. We’d have many more, and better, innovative solutions.”
  4. We need funders who trust young leaders as equals. One of the most popular sessions of the week was Flipping the Paradigm: A Challenge for Investors and Funders. Here, Deepa Gupta—social entrepreneur, activist, and founder of Jhatkaa.org—and George Gachara—Managing Partner at HEVA Fund LLP—pulled no punches as they discussed how funders and investors can best support the efforts of young people and youth-led organizations that are already taking the lead to create change. Among other points, they explored the value of a bottom-up approach in philanthropy and the need for investors to trust the young leaders in whom they invest. Drawing on her experience as a social entrepreneur who often works with funders, Gupta shared, “I’ve realized the philanthropic sector is designed to support the funder above the changemaker. This means, the more differently I think than the funder… the less my chances of obtaining funding.” Often, the consequence is that the most innovative, effective changemakers are not the ones being funded. To make a real impact, Gupta explained, “I seek a funder whose courage and creativity matches my own. I seek a funder who knows I am their equal.”
  5. We need to change power dynamics. Sometimes, organizations are willing to take a first step towards inclusion—listening to the suggestions of young people. While this is a step in the right direction, an additional—and more difficult—step must be taken to ensure that people from vulnerable communities are truly included. During Everyone’s Welcome: Learning from Youth-Led Movements, Melissa Diamond—Founder and Executive Director of A Global Voice for Autism—explained, “To take real strides in issues of inclusion, people in positions of power need to see that everyone wins when true inclusion is achieved. Ceding control is not actually a cessation of power if everyone’s lives improve. Ultimately, the only way is to show [people in power] that they too will win by participating in a more inclusive society.”

For the next year, people who registered for the summit will have continued access to the summit platform, including On Demand recordings of dozens of live and pre-recorded sessions. If you didn't register, don't worry—we are working to make content available through YDLC's YouTube channel, too.